Super Bowl 50: A Housing Highlight Reel

Posted on Feb 3 2016 - 11:07am by Suzanne De Vita
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Super BowlThe Super Bowl turns 50 this weekend. To mark the event’s golden anniversary, Census number-crunchers rounded up a collection of facts comparing life back in 1967 to present-day. The play-by-play includes housing stats, which we’ve broken down below.

In 1967…

  • The U.S. population was 197.5 million.
  • The median sales price of a new, single-family home was just $22,700.
  • The average household size was 3.28 people.
  • Approximately 70 percent of adults lived in a home with their spouse.

In 2016…

  • The U.S. population is 322.8 million—up 63 percent from 1967.
  • The median sales price of a new, single-family home is $282,800.
  • The average household size is 2.54 people.
  • Approximately 50 percent of adults live in a home with their spouse.

Contrasting 1967 and 2016, the median new, single-family home sales price, though not adjusted for inflation, illustrates the rising trajectory housing has taken in the last 50 years. Notably, household size has shrunk by approximately 25 percent (or, in Census measures, nearly 0.75 people). Co-habitation has also taken on new meaning, as more households today are comprised of unmarried partners and singles.

Housing in Super Bowl team cities Charlotte and Denver has seen considerable change in the last 50 years , too.

In Charlotte…

  • In 1995—the year of the Panthers’ first season—the population was 473,355. In 2014, the population of the Charlotte metropolitan area was 2,380,314!
  • In 2014, the median value of an owner-occupied home was $169,400—6.5 percent less than the national median of $181,200.
  • In 2014, the median household income was $53,549—on par with the national median of $53,657.

In Denver…

  • In 1960—the year of the Broncos’ first season—the population was 493,887. In 2014, the population of the Denver metropolitan area was 2,754,258!
  • In 2014, the median value of an owner-occupied home was $276,800—53 percent higher than the national median of $181,200.
  • In 2014, the median household income was $66,870—25 percent higher than the national median of $53,657.

Denver, recently named the hottest housing market of 2016 by Zillow, has seen considerable change in the last 50 years. Home prices in the Mile High City reached new all-time highs at the end of 2015, making it one of just three cities that reported double-digit annual growth last year.

Home prices in Charlotte, recently named the hottest housing market of 2016 by realtor.com, also peaked in 2015. The city and its surrounding areas will continue to experience an influx of new residents this year, thanks to expanding household incomes and a declining unemployment rate.

The hotness factor—and Super Bowl stakes—are high. Who will win the big game? Tapping this highlight reel, the outcome may be too close to call.

Suz
Suzanne De Vita is RISMedia’s online associate editor. Carolina’s going all the way!

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2 Comments so far. Feel free to join this conversation.

  1. Duke Fyffe February 6, 2016 at 3:32 am - Reply

    I’ve been a Denver Realtor for 44 years. This is a great piece for all the Denver residents to view. I’ll show it to as many as possible. Thank you!

  2. Mike Karras February 7, 2016 at 9:10 am - Reply

    Great article. Enjoy the SuperBowl. Go Panthers!

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